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Championship Productions Featured Items!
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  • 02/13/19--22:00: Ryan Odom Basketball 2-Pack
  • BD-05499A:

    with Ryan Odom,
    UMBC Head Coach;
    Coached UMBC to the first ever #16-seed win over a #1-seed in the NCAA Tournament (2018);
    Led UMBC to a 25-11 record, including the 2018 America East Conference Tournament Championship (a school record for wins);
    2018 Hugh Durham National Coach of the Year Award; 2017 Joe B. Hall Award recipient, given to the top first-year coach in Division I

    Odom's dynamic, up-tempo style of play forces the hand of any defense, including some of the highest rated lock-down defenses in college basketball. In this video, you'll get the inside look at Odom's motion offense and how to teach his style of play through various fundamental drills.

    Drills

    Coach Odom starts every practice with a passing drill. Getting your players moving and excited for practice is a great way to open your team's preparation. You'll see what Odom deems 'freelance ball handling' in which players are given the freedom to be creative and learn to handle the ball. Both guards and posts develop their ball handling skills during this time.

    Once players are loose and have practiced a skill they want to work on, you can transition into building your half court offense. In Two Man Ball Screens, your players will learn to work together and play together. Players discover how to recognize and read the defense, then react accordingly to create a scoring opportunity. Odom teaches the side ball screen, angle ball screen, middle ball screen, and how to clip or fake the ball screen. These are excellent drills that will help players transition into motion offense shooting. In UMBC's shooting series, players get up game shots and learn how to get open using a V-cut, drive and kick, or a flip back pass to create scoring action.

    Motion Offense

    Beginning in the full court, Coach Odom teaches the fast break system that was so successful against a variety of defenses. Players will be trained to hunt for their shot within the first 7-10 seconds of the shot clock. This puts pressure on the defense to sprint back. The keys to getting a good shot are receiving a quick outlet, being creative as players aim for the paint, and searching for open 3-pointers and layups.

    Odom showcases his fast break system and half court offense with a 12 second drill. You'll learn how to use drag screens, double drag screens, thru cuts, back cuts and more.

    Odom's exciting look at his team's fast paced style of play will show you, firsthand, the hard work, attention to detail and integral building blocks for a program on the rise!

    139 minutes. 2019.



    BD-05499B:

    with Ryan Odom,
    UMBC Head Coach;
    Coached UMBC to the first ever #16-seed win over a #1-seed in the NCAA Tournament (2018);
    Led UMBC to a 25-11 record, including the 2018 America East Conference Tournament Championship (a school record for wins);
    2018 Hugh Durham National Coach of the Year Award; 2017 Joe B. Hall Award recipient, given to the top first-year coach in Division I

    Every scrappy, tenacious team is built behind the scenes when no one is watching. This video featuring Coach Ryan Odom gives you many of the drills that he used to construct his program from the ground up. You'll see a variety of competitive exercises that you can implement with your own team to prepare them to beat any opponent on a given night.

    Drills

    A great practice is built on learning game-like situations within the drill setting. Odom demonstrates a variety of exercises his program uses daily to build their players' ability to defend and score.

    In 1v1 Closeouts and 1v1 Rebounding, athletes must pursue the ball to get a quick outlet while sprinting the floor and looking for an open 3-pointer or layup. V-Cut Passing helps ensure players communicate as they pass the ball up the floor, simulating a fast break. Your players will learn to catch with two hands and explode to the basket as they get closer to the rim.

    Skill Development

    Guard and post breakdown drills are a great way to build your athletes' ability to score. Coach Odom demonstrates a variety of motion action and finishing drills for both perimeter and post players. In Motion Action, he teaches half court rules and actions to prepare his players to read the defense and score. Post players work on cutting to the rim, especially in transition.

    Half Court Offense

    Coach Odom rounds out his team's practice by having players run 5v5. Athletes work on utilizing motion actions and post finishes in a 5v5 setting. In Heat Transition, players apply their attacking mentality and look to take advantage of a transition situation. Odom uses quick outlet passes and catching with two hands as fundamental principles that will carry over into any drill or game situation.

    This video demonstrates how Coach Odom-coached teams have developed their reputation for being able to compete against any team on any given night: through sound, fundamental basketball and a tenacious fervor to compete how they practice. This 'inside look' at some of Coach Odom's competitive practice drills is undoubtedly a must-have video for any coach's collection!

    112 minutes. 2019.




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    with Greg Gard,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    Sweet Sixteen appearances in '16 and '17;
    2016 Jim Phelan National Coach of the Year;
    long-time Assistant, then Associate Head Coach, under legendary coach Bo Ryan

    This video from Wisconsin's Greg Gard will teach you all about the fundamentals of post play - a lost art in today's evolving perimeter-oriented game. Gard passes on some of his favorite post drills that can be taught to introduce important concepts to your new players, or to your veterans to brush up on essential skills. Throughout the video, Gard gives pointers on how to cut down on turnovers to ensure your team gets more quality possessions on offense.

    Eliminating Turnovers

    Coach Gard puts his wealth of basketball knowledge on display as he explains how to help your players cut down on turnovers. He takes simple drills that practice fundamental facets of the game and makes them applicable to basketball in the modern era.

    While the player who makes an imperfect pass is usually blamed for a turnover, Gard takes a closer look at the receiver, who is often just as guilty. He discusses, and then drills, nine different aspects of the turnover from the receiving end. He introduces a simple passing drill that progressively builds and works on multiple skills at once for both passers and receivers.

    Post Play

    Next, Coach Gard dives into post play, with several drills for your entire time to use that will develop their skills in a short amount of time. These drills don't just cover what to do when the ball gets into the post - they also touch on everything leading up to the post feed.

    Gard also demonstrates two variations of one of his favorite drills: "Football." The variations will help you develop toughness in your post players by forcing them to compete against each other down low. These skills include sealing in the post and using one of the five signature post moves Gard and his staff teach at Wisconsin.

    If implemented and drilled daily, the exercises in this video from Coach Gard will help your athletes cut down on turnovers and improve their post play. This is a great resource for any coach whose philosophy centers around nailing the details during every game!

    46 minutes. 2019.


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    with Brad Underwood,
    University of Illinois Head Coach;
    former Oklahoma State University & Stephen F. Austin University Head Coach;
    3x ('14-'16) Southland Conference Regular Season & Tournament Champions;
    2x (2015 & 2014) Southland Conference Coach of the Year; 2014 Joe B. Hall Award Recipient (Nation's top first-year coach),
    2014 Jim Phelan Award Finalist (top Division I coach), 2x (2015 & 2014) Hugh Durham Award Finalist (top mid-major coach)

    Beginning with his time at Stephen F. Austin, Brad Underwood has taken his teams to the NCAA Tournament on a consistent basis. Using the spread motion offense and a high-pressure defense, his teams have become tough-nosed, gritty and one of the toughest outs on any given night.

    In this video, you'll get an inside look at a complete practice for his Fighting Illini. Underwood explains how his coaching staff teaches and installs their motion offense and transition defense.

    Defense

    As Coach Underwood explains, defense is the foundation of hard work. You will learn basic drills that teach the fundamentals of an up-the-line, on-the-line defense and create a culture of hard work. In 3 Line Closeouts, players work to influence the ball sideline and work on the first step to defend an attacker. Underwood teaches players to use a big step instead of a small false step.

    For his ball screen defense, Coach Underwood uses a continuous 2v2 drill to teach his players to force everyone left. By using a hard hedge and icing the ball handler, his teams are able to attack dribblers and force teams to prepare for multiple types of ball screen defenses.

    Using the Shell Drill, Underwood teaches his players rotations and help-side defense. He builds up from 3v3 to 5v5 teaching baseline rotations, ball screen rotations, and forcing ball handlers to the left to shrink the court.

    Rounding out the defensive portion of his presentation, Coach Underwood takes you through his team's 1-2-2 full court pressure that works to get deflections and wear down the offense. By focusing on deflections, his teams set a goal of 35 per game to force opponents to constantly play on their heels and make bad passes.

    Offense

    You'll get an in-depth look at how Underwood builds his spread motion offense in this insightful video. Through build up drills, players take part of the offense and master how to attack the rim off the ball screen or over-closeout. In the Quick 3 drill, his team focuses on getting defensive rebounds and pushing the ball up the floor within seven seconds to try and score. By sprinting up the floor, his teams are able to apply constant pressure on opponents with their culture of no rest on the defensive or offensive end of the court.

    You'll see the 2 Man Game exercise, in which guards and posts work together to get downhill off of ball screens in the half court. Coach Underwood's 5 on 0 portion helps players learn how the offense flows effortlessly, as well as how to get 2-3 lifts and ball reversals each time down the floor. This puts constant pressure on the defense and wears them down over the course of the game.

    By creating a culture predicated on toughness, Coach Underwood's players have bought into a system that makes them work hard and think of the team first. In this video, you'll get an inside look at how Underwood teaches his young team the basics of their offensive system while pushing his players to play hard-nosed, gritty defense to grind out games!

    158 minutes. 2019.


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    with Ryan Odom,
    UMBC Head Coach;
    Coached UMBC to the first ever #16-seed win over a #1-seed in the NCAA Tournament (2018);
    Led UMBC to a 25-11 record, including the 2018 America East Conference Tournament Championship (a school record for wins);
    2018 Hugh Durham National Coach of the Year Award; 2017 Joe B. Hall Award recipient, given to the top first-year coach in Division I

    Odom's dynamic, up-tempo style of play forces the hand of any defense, including some of the highest rated lock-down defenses in college basketball. In this video, you'll get the inside look at Odom's motion offense and how to teach his style of play through various fundamental drills.

    Drills

    Coach Odom starts every practice with a passing drill. Getting your players moving and excited for practice is a great way to open your team's preparation. You'll see what Odom deems 'freelance ball handling' in which players are given the freedom to be creative and learn to handle the ball. Both guards and posts develop their ball handling skills during this time.

    Once players are loose and have practiced a skill they want to work on, you can transition into building your half court offense. In Two Man Ball Screens, your players will learn to work together and play together. Players discover how to recognize and read the defense, then react accordingly to create a scoring opportunity. Odom teaches the side ball screen, angle ball screen, middle ball screen, and how to clip or fake the ball screen. These are excellent drills that will help players transition into motion offense shooting. In UMBC's shooting series, players get up game shots and learn how to get open using a V-cut, drive and kick, or a flip back pass to create scoring action.

    Motion Offense

    Beginning in the full court, Coach Odom teaches the fast break system that was so successful against a variety of defenses. Players will be trained to hunt for their shot within the first 7-10 seconds of the shot clock. This puts pressure on the defense to sprint back. The keys to getting a good shot are receiving a quick outlet, being creative as players aim for the paint, and searching for open 3-pointers and layups.

    Odom showcases his fast break system and half court offense with a 12 second drill. You'll learn how to use drag screens, double drag screens, thru cuts, back cuts and more.

    Odom's exciting look at his team's fast paced style of play will show you, firsthand, the hard work, attention to detail and integral building blocks for a program on the rise!

    139 minutes. 2019.


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    with John Calipari,
    University of Kentucky Head Coach;
    2012 NCAA National Champions; 2014 NCAA Championship Runner-Up;
    Distinguished member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (2015);
    3x Naismith National Coach of the Year ('96, '08, '15); 3x NABC Coach of the Year ('96, '09, '15);
    AP College Coach of the Year (2015); 2x Basketball Times Coach of the Year ('96, '15);
    2x Adolph Rupp Cup ('10, '15);
    30x Conference (SEC, C-USA, A10) Championships (15x regular season, 15x tournament)

    Hall of Fame coach John Calipari has a long history of taking players with immense offensive talent and turning them into multifaceted team-oriented players who have the ability to player multiple positions and make an impact on defense.

    Coach Cal has coached some of the highest performing teams in the history of the game thanks to an ability to recruit a high level of talent and potential and his top-tier development methods. In this 'Open Practice' video, Calipari brings in an audience of coaches and slows down his practices and details how he teaches each drill to help players develop into true professionals.

    Defensive Drills

    In session 1, Coach Calipari guides you through his defensive breakdown. He begins with simple footwork within his players' stance. Athletes focus on "big stepping" so they can stay in front of a ball handler and level a drive. Building on the basic stance, Calipari demonstrates how he wants his players to closeout to a shooter and force them to become a mid-range player. The ability to closeout and recover to an open shooter leads into working in disadvantage 4 on 3 closeout situations. Your players will learn to communicate and fly around the floor while protecting the basket and preventing open drives.

    The Transition Build Up drill tasks athletes to apply four basic principles: get back, no 3-pointers, sprint on offense, and dive on the floor to make reads on offense and force the play on defense. Starting with 2-on-1 and building into 3-on-2, 4-on-3, 5-on-4, and 5-on-5 transition, you'll see the pace and play they use to control the speed of each game.

    Rounding out the defensive segment, players apply their defensive principles in 5v5 pick & roll coverage. Coach Cal slows down the offense and demonstrates how they defend different actions off of a pick & roll situations. This is an excellent time for your players to learn how to defend a pick & roll while protecting the basket.

    Zone Coverage - featuring Tony Barbee, Assistant Coach

    Assistant Coach Tony Barbee demonstrates five ways an offense can look to beat a zone defense and how Kentucky counters to defend those actions. Starting with the top of your zone, Barbee demonstrates how you can show strength with your top guards. Players should be aggressive and have their hands up to deflect passes, which will lead to easy turnovers and buckets going the other way. When coaches try to counter with a big, mobile post in the middle, you can take your 5-man and have them play in man-to-man principles. Meanwhile, wing players work to take away easy post passes.

    This is an excellent video that allows you to get in an inside look at the practice methods Kentucky uses year in and year out. Coach Calipari is a fantastic teacher and developer of skills, and his drills will be sure to help you raise the talent level of your own team.

    170 minutes. 2019.


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    with Todd Phillips,
    Salt Lake Community College Head Coach;
    2016 NJCAA Division I National Champions;
    2016 Spalding NJCAA Division I Men's Basketball Coach of the Year

    This video from 2016 National Junior College Coach of the Year Todd Phillips will get your creative juices flowing as you consider future practices, seasons and teams!

    Coach Phillips has fine-tuned his philosophy from some of the best in the game of basketball. You'll see him break down how a practice can develop players and the details that coaches need to emphasize to make sure players develop not only skills, but the confidence and positive culture to build a successful team.

    Pre-Practice: 7 Minutes of Skill

    The most important aspect in today's game is developing your players day after day; working to improve their overall game will only make your team better. Coach Phillips demonstrates several drills that he utilizes on a daily basis to develop athletes within his offensive system.

    Every player will get the opportunity to work on both perimeter and post skills. They must be able to execute proper footwork and change directions. Example: The 'pro hop' focuses on players' ability to change speed and direction while attacking the rim.

    Practice Sessions

    Phillips explains how his practice sessions are organized to better serve his athletes. Through a variety of full- and half-court drills, players get moving and motivated; attacking the rim, competing at a high level and refining their outside shot.

    You'll get three team shooting drills that contain a lot of reps with timed goals. Players are 'put to the test' and given a shooting license, allowing them to better understand their role on the team and how they can improve.

    X-Men Drill

    In this drill, Phillips is able to teach multiple concepts and skills at once. He demonstrates how his team uses the drill and provides examples for how you can creatively change the drill to fit your program's needs. Using the entire court, players apply speed dribbling, dribble hand-offs, backdoor cuts and pick & roll situations - all while improving the ball handling skills needed to break down opponents.

    Coach Phillips knows and understands how enthusiasm and energy can help build confidence in players. Learn how Coach Phillips prepares his teams to take the next step in their development at every practice!

    Produced at the Nike Championship Basketball Coaches Clinic in Indianapolis (IN) Fall 2016.

    70 minutes. 2018.


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    with Eric Musselman,
    University of Nevada Head Coach;
    2018 Sweet 16; 2018 MWC Coach of the Year; 2017 MVC Tournament Champions;
    2016 CBI Championship;Back-to-Back ('17, '18) MWC Regular Season Champions;
    former Head Coach for the Golden State Warriors and Sacramento Kings;
    2012 NBA D-League Coach of the Year

    After 15+ years coaching in the NBA, Eric Musselman shifted to the college game and has since found a home at the University of Nevada. His hard work paid off in 2017 and 2018 with back-to-back NCAA Tournament appearances that included a Sweet Sixteen run in '18.

    Now, you can go inside the gym with Coach for two complete practice sessions. If you've ever wanted to see a Musselman-run practice, but would prefer to do it from the comfort of your own home/office, then this is your chance!

    Practice 1

    In this first practice, you will see how to fit in over 20 drill segments with the use of stations run by Musselman's assistant coaches. These stations focus on a variety of emphases from skill development, to offensive or defensive breakdowns that teach their style of play on both sides of the ball.

    Next, expand your playbook with numerous man-to-man quick hitters for half court situations, transition, breaking the press, and inbounding the ball. You'll also get a chance to see how to attack pick & rolls with multiple defensive coverages including switches, blitzes, and hard shows.

    Practice 2

    Coach Musselman continues to pack in great ideas for you to add to your practices with over 20 drills featured in this second practice. Musselman runs them through numerous set plays that could be difference makers in your next game. You'll also see how to handle double teams in the post with offensive breakdown drills that teach the whole team how to react as a coordinated unit.

    This practice features extensive segments that highlight Musselman's man-to-man defense. The 3-on-3 full court drill and other breakdown drills will teach your players how to stunt in help, blitz the ball, and fight through dribble hand-offs.

    Coach Musselman is an expert at crafting top-notch practices. These 'All Access', inside looks into 2 practice sessions will give you a ton of great drills to adopt, as well as many plays that are useful for various situations on offense. Don't miss this chance to learn from one of the great culture-builders in the game today!

    161 minutes (2 videos). 2019.


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    with Ed Cooley,
    Providence College Head Coach;
    2014 Big East Tournament Champions;
    2011 MAAC Coach of the Year;
    2010 Ben Jobe National Coach of the Year

    You can't beat experience! With better scouting going on at almost every level of basketball, it's imperative to know the ins and outs of your offense and have solutions to any scenario. Providence head coach Ed Cooley has over 20 years of experience running the flex offense and has seen nearly every conceivable move to take down the flex. In this video, he gives you many of the solutions that he's come up with to ensure his flex offense continues to carve up opponents. You'll see the tried and true flex offense that basketball coaches have become accustomed to; however, Coach Cooley shares some advanced-level wrinkles, adjustments, and counters for all kinds of defensive adjustments for those who already know the basics of the Flex.

    Transition Offense Review

    Cooley begins by reviewing his transition offense and how it can flow seamlessly into the flex. He goes over inbounding the ball, player positions, and how to get your athletes to buy in with different names for their spots in transition.

    As he does throughout the presentation, Cooley discusses the many reads that players should learn to make in order to maximize scoring possibilities, such as the "double drop, tap and go" progression within his transition set.

    The Flex Offense

    Once in the half court, Coach Cooley details his flex offense progressions, giving rules and structure to an offense that can have all five players be interchangeable. He takes you through his flex sequence, in which he details both strong side and weak side action to keep players cutting and screening with a purpose.

    As with any continuity offense, a good defense will pick up on the movements and deny and pressure certain players and options. Cooley discusses several pressure release options that are sure to give defenses a headache!

    Flex Adjustments

    From switching screens to player bumps, Cooley covers it all. With multiple adjustments and plays, you will see how to put your players in position to thrive against any defensive change up with nine different variations/adjustments.

    Versus Zone Defense

    Finally, Coach Cooley runs through some of his favorite plays versus zone defenses and how to attack from inside and outside the 3-point line.

    Coach Cooley knows the flex offense well and shares his insights from years of experience in a manner that is both informative and humorous. This video is ideal for teams that run the flex a few variations to frustrate defenses and win more games!

    75 minutes. 2019.


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    with Bryan Petersen,
    Kirkwood Community College Head Coach;
    2016 NJCAA DII National Champions;
    2016 Spalding National Coach of the Year;
    2x ICCAC Champions (2016, 2018);
    NJCAA All-American at Kirkwood;
    Petersen is the first in NJCAA DII National Tournament history to win the Championship as a coach and play in the National Championship game;
    former player at Iowa State and graduate assistant under Greg McDermott and Fred Hoiberg

    In today's game, there's a major emphasis on up-tempo style of play. As you extend your season of play, opposing teams will plan to take away your transition game and force you to beat them within the half-court.

    NJCAA National Championship coach Bryan Petersen breaks down the finer points of his half court offense that have been influenced by offense masterminds Greg McDermott and Fred Hoiberg. He shows you how to incorporate principles of spacing, ball movement, screening, timing, and shot selection into an effective half court offense. With quality spacing comes quality shots, and Coach Petersen will help you locate those sweet spots on the floor for your team with technique and drills.

    Basic Motion Offense

    Petersen explains the right distance for great spacing in the half court as 15 feet or more between teammates. He covers the areas and spots on the floor within his half-court attack from a 4-Out 1-In or 3-out 2-In alignment.

    To maintain maximum spacing, players need to understand how to react to penetration. You'll see athletes walk through dribble penetration movements while reacting to drives from the wing to the baseline and from wing to the middle.

    Spacing Drill

    Spacing in any offense is important, but you rarely see communication being emphasized within an offense. Petersen streamlines spacing within the offense by having players working certain areas of the floor. Athletes will flash to open areas or cut through while communicating. Great teams communicate, and Petersen's teams incorporate plenty of talking in his offense.

    Wing Continuity Ball Screen Offense

    As you build your offense, cutting through and filling open areas is important. Petersen builds off those concepts and incorporates ball screens on the wings. Ball screens are within the flow off the offense and are always used when a side of the floor is isolated by the two offensive players involved.

    You'll see Petersen's "20" wing ball screen continuity offense. This offense is built in a 3-Out 2-In set, looking to create hard closeouts and produce middle penetration at the rim. He explores the simplicity of the offense while creating multiple options based upon defensive adjustments. This offense is built for back-to-the-basket inside post players, while providing options for pick & pop post players.

    Eventually, opposing teams will pick up on the pattern, and for this reason Petersen shows two counters for wing and corner denials.

    Breakdown Drills

    Petersen moves into various 3-on-0 breakdown drills to help create a strong continuity for the ball screen motion with various adjustments. He incorporates more post touches and reactions in this breakdown series. Players work on getting open versus pressure and working 3-on-0 in different spots on the floor.

    Set Plays

    You'll get five set plays that can be used to counter defensive adjustments within the 20 offense.

    • 1 - Gets your best shooter a shot.
    • 25 - Uses a back screen for your best finisher and is a good counter for teams that hard hedge.
    • Thumbs Up - For a shooter with a hot hand, especially good against teams that switch ball screens.
    • Thumbs Down - Designed to get a post touch.
    • "Cyclone" and "Cyclone Slip" - A late game full-court set for a 3-point shot.

    If you're looking for more ways to dissect opposing defenses in the half court, this video from Coach Petersen is a great option. The breakdown of floor spacing into his ball screen motion offense will give you the tools to get great shots at the rim and strong perimeter shot choices.

    Produced at the Nike Championship Basketball Coaches Clinic in Indianapolis (IN) Fall 2016.

    63 minutes. 2018.


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    with Bob McKillop,
    Davidson College Head Coach;
    2018 A-10 Tournament champions; 2015 A-10 regular season champions;
    2017 Joe Lapchick Character Award; 2008 Clair Bee Coach of the Year;
    2013 USA Men's Basketball World University Games Head Coach;
    11x Southern Conference regular season champions;
    17x SoCon Tournament champions; 8x SoCon Coach of the Year;
    2008 Elite Eight; 2008 NABC Coach of the Year;
    over 550 career wins

    Long-time Davidson head coach Bob McKillop has guided the Wildcats to over 550 career wins against some of the best programs in Division I basketball. Over the years, he has learned that teaching players how to read the defense is the best way for athletes to learn how to play the game.

    With 16 trips to postseason tournaments, Coach McKillop has the experience and leadership that most programs long to have. In this video, he demonstrates how his offensive philosophy has changed over the past three decades to one that focuses teaching players, rather than relying on sets.

    Philosophy and Principles

    Keeping the game simple has allowed McKillop to become one of the best offensive-minded coaches in today's game. He has seven fundamental keys that guide his offense:

    • Seeing
    • Talking
    • Acting
    • Detailed
    • Flesh to flesh contact
    • Finish things
    • Down and balanced

    These principles have helped him create a balanced offensive attack. McKillop's offense has just five basic rules to go along with the fundamental keys: attack space, finish your cut, dribble with a purpose, help someone, and catch and see. These rules can help you teach your players how to play without sets.

    Strategies and Techniques

    Possessing a basic understanding of the offense will allow you to focus on the details. McKillop demonstrates how he teaches his offense using a 3 on 0 setup. In this setup, he describes how his players will read the defense and attack the open space that is given up. He teaches athletes to develop a "next shot is the most important shot" mindset. In this setup, players are able to learn the movements, actions, and techniques they need to be successful. Additionally, it forces the defense to conform to your players, taking them out of their typical game plan.

    3 Possession Reads

    In this drill, McKillop teaches the basic principles, actions, and movements within his offense. He shows three simple actions that will increase scoring opportunities for your players:

    • Step in screen (screen your own)
    • Cut screen
    • Fade screen

    With these simple screens, your offense is limitless in the actions you can use to get open. Of course, for each screen, timing is vital because without it, players will miss open scoring opportunities.

    This is an outstanding motion offense video. It teaches you how to instruct your players to get open with and without the ball all while using simple actions. Coach McKillop demonstrates why his program has been a consistent offensive threat against any opponent they play. You will learn a great deal of offense and how to teach it to your own players.

    107 minutes. 2019.


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  • 03/23/19--22:00: Unscoutable On-Ball Offense
  • with Eric Bridgeland,
    Whitman College Head Coach;
    led Whitman to a 104-14 record (.881) from 2014-15 through 2017-18;
    back-to-back unbeaten conference records in 2017 & 2018;
    2018 Basketball Times D-II Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 HoopDirt.com D-III Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 NABC West District Coach of the Year

    Eric Bridgeland, head coach at Whitman College, led his team to back-to-back undefeated conference records in the 2016-17 and 2017-18 seasons thanks to an offensive system that was virtually impossible for opponents to stop. A huge portion of Bridgeland's offense hinges on his players' ability to make the correct decisions when using ball screens, and in this video, he passes on his methods for helping athletes pick their spots to attack off ball screens.

    Philosophy

    On offense, your goal should always be to get easy scoring opportunities as close to the basket as possible. Ball screens are one of the best avenues to getting deep in the paint to create these scoring chances.

    Coach Bridgeland's ball screen approach, combined with his attacking fence offense, is designed to teach players to run, get to the paint, put constant pressure on the defense, and produce more possessions. Ball screens give players ownership of the offense, as they are the ones creating and mastering the action as the game goes on.

    Guard Breakdown

    In his guard breakdown, Bridgeland teaches how to attack various types of screen defense. From the hard show to soft show, to switching defenses, to icing the ball handler, your guards will learn how to attack them all coming off of a screen.

    Through 2v2 drills, players learn to change their speed as they approach the screen and look to square up just past the screener to create misdirection. Off of this action, they can look to attack. Whether pushing off the leg of the defender as they go by or getting low using a bulldog drive into the paint, your players will create advantages they can use to get into the paint.

    Post Breakdown

    In the post break down, Bridgeland shows how to set solid screens and keep proper spacing. Post players learn to pop off the screen if they have range to help spread out the defense. They also learn to roll wide just outside the lane line, which allows the ball handler to continue to attack the rim and get into the paint. In Bridgeland's 1v1 drill, post players set the screen on a defender and read the help-side defender to determine how they are supposed to react to the screen.

    Rounding out the video is a 3v3 and 4v4 live section where players learn to read screens in game speed. Coach Bridgeland uses the 3v3 and 4v4 formats to make the practice environment more controlled and help players adjust to the faster pace.

    This is an excellent video for coaches looking to use ball screens as a complement to their base offense. Ball screens can open up a wide array of scoring opportunities and Coach Bridgeland shows how to help your team master the concept!

    81 minutes. 2019.


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    with Eric Bridgeland,
    Whitman College Head Coach;
    led Whitman to a 104-14 record (.881) from 2014-15 through 2017-18;
    back-to-back unbeaten conference records in 2017 & 2018;
    2018 Basketball Times D-II Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 HoopDirt.com D-III Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 NABC West District Coach of the Year

    With over 300 career wins at the Division III level, Eric Bridgeland has proven he has the coaching chops to develop high-achieving teams. A run of successful seasons under Coach Bridgeland has placed Whitman as one of the top programs in the country that also focuses on developing off the court relationships and leaders in today's world. His fast-paced system has made for a fun style of play that your players will love to play within themselves.

    Philosophy

    In Coach Bridgeland's unstoppable fast break, all bets are off. Players are taught to get to the paint - no matter what. If you can keep your dribble and attack in the open court, do it! If you can hit the wings flying up the court, do it and attack middle! If you can hit a rim runner for an easy score at the rim, do it! By attacking mid-line defenders, your opponent will quickly find themselves in foul trouble and frustrated due to allowing easy buckets at the rim.

    You'll see how to teach your athletes to draw two defenders to open up the floor and create more driving lanes once the ball is in the half court. This style of play makes it tough for defenses to deny or take away any one player, as all athletes on offense are looking to attack the paint. You'll put constant pressure on the defense to stop you at the rim.

    Spacing and Rules

    In order to open the floor, Bridgeland incorporates a traditional setup: two wings, an inbounder, a post runner, and a ball handler. The ball handler looks to advance the ball as quickly as possible by dribbling or hitting the open wing ahead. Coach Bridgeland gives his point guard three rules to remember at all times:

    • Get the ball inbound quickly
    • Get to the paint as soon as possible
    • Make sure you have a trail inbounder

    Drills

    4v0 Transition will allow your players to get used to sprinting to their spots. Players start out at a 75% pace and move up and down the floor, creating proper spacing and positioning. In this pace, athletes are able to visualize where the defense will cut them off and how to reverse the ball quickly in order to create another driving angle to score.

    Using traditional fast break drills, Coach Bridgeland helps his players develop the speed and passing skills necessary to play at a fast pace and also attack the paint. Guards work in a 2v2 format, focusing on getting open off the inbound pass and attacking the middle third of the floor. They also work to get open to split their defenders and create separation.

    Rounding out the video, Bridgeland finishes with 5v0 and 5v5 situations where players have to put everything together in a set amount of time. This teaches athletes to be aware of time and score and helps them get an idea of how quickly they need to move up and down the floor in transition.

    This video from Coach Bridgeland is a great resource for any program. Your players will have fun running and attacking the basket aggressively while collecting easy transition buckets.

    61 minutes. 2019.


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  • 03/23/19--22:00: The Fence Offense
  • with Eric Bridgeland,
    Whitman College Head Coach;
    led Whitman to a 104-14 record (.881) from 2014-15 through 2017-18;
    back-to-back unbeaten conference records in 2017 & 2018;
    2018 Basketball Times D-II Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 HoopDirt.com D-III Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 NABC West District Coach of the Year

    With a 104-14 record over the span of four seasons (2015-2018), Whitman College head coach Eric Bridgeland has clearly figured out an offensive system that consistently wins games. That system? The Fence Offense!

    The fence offense is similar in many ways to the popular dribble drive motion offense with a few slight differences. Bridgeland has incorporated more dribble hand-offs, flare screens, and relocation keys that make the fence offense equally, if not more effective than the dribble drive. This video contains everything Bridgeland uses to teach the fence offense and will help you learn to use it within your own program.

    Spacing and Positioning

    Using the NBA 3-point line, players space into the baseline corners, short corner post, and have their heels on the sideline as they're free throw line extended. From there, Bridgeland shows how to create slides and reads as a ball handler gets downhill and touches the paint, creating a scoring opportunity.

    Whether it's scoring off the dribble or hitting a pitch, throw back or post slide, your players will learn to attack the rim fast and furious. Bridgeland enforces a "no standing zone" (baseline to free throw) as a way to gauge when and where players are supposed to move during a drive.

    Offensive Actions

    The best offenses have multiple actions that can be used to score the ball. Beginning with flare screen action, your players will learn to over-exaggerate their screens, preparing them for game speed action. As the ball handler attacks the paint, weak side players use a flare screen to set up an open 3-pointer. If the flare isn't open, the corner pitch is open to reverse the ball and use a two pass reverse to attack the paint again.

    When the flare isn't available, your players will be able to initiate action through dribble hand-offs on the strong side of the floor, opening up a gap for wing players to attack the rim. Off of the dribble hand-off, athletes have multiple options, including:

    • Catch and shoot
    • Catch, fake, and shoot
    • Catch, fake, two dribble attack
    • Throw back for a shot after a paint touch

    Bridgeland also demonstrates how to put both the flare and the dribble hand-off together for the main action in the offense. Using both actions together on ball reversals or initial action, your offense can get the ball into the paint and create easy scoring opportunities.

    Reads and Film

    Rounding out Bridgeland's in-depth look at the fence offense is a read drill where players learn to read the help-side and middle defenders. From there, athletes can create multiple attacking actions. Coach Bridgeland also provides a few game clips from previous seasons so you see the action in real speed.

    For coaches looking to implement an offense that's similar to (but simpler than) the dribble drive offense, look no further than Coach Bridgeland's fence offense!

    58 minutes. 2019.


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  • 03/23/19--22:00: Offensive Individual Musts
  • with Eric Bridgeland,
    Whitman College Head Coach;
    led Whitman to a 104-14 record (.881) from 2014-15 through 2017-18;
    back-to-back unbeaten conference records in 2017 & 2018;
    2018 Basketball Times D-II Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 HoopDirt.com D-III Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 NABC West District Coach of the Year

    Since taking over as head coach at Whitman College, Eric Bridgeland has produced three players who have captured Northwest Conference player of the year honors. In this video, he includes a closer look at how he develops players' individual skill sets and gets them ready for the next level of competition.

    Foundational Drills

    Beginning with form shooting, Coach Bridgeland has his athletes use a low squat stance to collect power from their legs, hold their fingertips out, and over-exaggerate their follow-through to develop shooting technique.

    In the Attacking Defenders drill, your players will play 1v1 and use Bridgeland's direct drive concept: players throw the ball out in front of them and chase after it to get to the paint in as few dribbles as necessary. It's here that athletes practice getting low and clipping the hip of their defender to separate themselves from the defense.

    Advanced Skills

    After laying out the foundation moves for his players, Bridgeland kicks things up a notch. In 2 Ball Shooting, players use a variety of actions to attack the paint and get to the rim. In Rip and Go, athletes play 2v1 and work on reading the attacker as the defender makes them pull up or stop in the middle of the paint. If a player can finish around the rim, Bridgeland requires them to do so. Meanwhile, if an attacker needs to kick the ball out, the offensive player creeps and swoops around the NBA 3-point line to maximize their spacing on the floor. Bridgeland finishes the drill using the jab & fake and separation moves to equip players with the tools they need to succeed.

    In ASE Jump Shot, players relocate off of a baseline drive and work on rising into their shot. They also practice combining moves as they move around the floor, working on step backs, the rip and go, or using any other separation move they feel necessary.

    This is an excellent individual skill development video taught by a coach who has sent six players overseas to play professionally in the last 10 years. His attention to detail and emphasis on attacking the rim are universal skills that will benefit any basketball player in any system.

    58 minutes. 2019.


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    BD-05519A:

    with Eric Bridgeland,
    Whitman College Head Coach;
    led Whitman to a 104-14 record (.881) from 2014-15 through 2017-18;
    back-to-back unbeaten conference records in 2017 & 2018;
    2018 Basketball Times D-II Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 HoopDirt.com D-III Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 NABC West District Coach of the Year

    Eric Bridgeland, head coach at Whitman College, led his team to back-to-back undefeated conference records in the 2016-17 and 2017-18 seasons thanks to an offensive system that was virtually impossible for opponents to stop. A huge portion of Bridgeland's offense hinges on his players' ability to make the correct decisions when using ball screens, and in this video, he passes on his methods for helping athletes pick their spots to attack off ball screens.

    Philosophy

    On offense, your goal should always be to get easy scoring opportunities as close to the basket as possible. Ball screens are one of the best avenues to getting deep in the paint to create these scoring chances.

    Coach Bridgeland's ball screen approach, combined with his attacking fence offense, is designed to teach players to run, get to the paint, put constant pressure on the defense, and produce more possessions. Ball screens give players ownership of the offense, as they are the ones creating and mastering the action as the game goes on.

    Guard Breakdown

    In his guard breakdown, Bridgeland teaches how to attack various types of screen defense. From the hard show to soft show, to switching defenses, to icing the ball handler, your guards will learn how to attack them all coming off of a screen.

    Through 2v2 drills, players learn to change their speed as they approach the screen and look to square up just past the screener to create misdirection. Off of this action, they can look to attack. Whether pushing off the leg of the defender as they go by or getting low using a bulldog drive into the paint, your players will create advantages they can use to get into the paint.

    Post Breakdown

    In the post break down, Bridgeland shows how to set solid screens and keep proper spacing. Post players learn to pop off the screen if they have range to help spread out the defense. They also learn to roll wide just outside the lane line, which allows the ball handler to continue to attack the rim and get into the paint. In Bridgeland's 1v1 drill, post players set the screen on a defender and read the help-side defender to determine how they are supposed to react to the screen.

    Rounding out the video is a 3v3 and 4v4 live section where players learn to read screens in game speed. Coach Bridgeland uses the 3v3 and 4v4 formats to make the practice environment more controlled and help players adjust to the faster pace.

    This is an excellent video for coaches looking to use ball screens as a complement to their base offense. Ball screens can open up a wide array of scoring opportunities and Coach Bridgeland shows how to help your team master the concept!

    81 minutes. 2019.



    BD-05519B:

    with Eric Bridgeland,
    Whitman College Head Coach;
    led Whitman to a 104-14 record (.881) from 2014-15 through 2017-18;
    back-to-back unbeaten conference records in 2017 & 2018;
    2018 Basketball Times D-II Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 HoopDirt.com D-III Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 NABC West District Coach of the Year

    With a 104-14 record over the span of four seasons (2015-2018), Whitman College head coach Eric Bridgeland has clearly figured out an offensive system that consistently wins games. That system? The Fence Offense!

    The fence offense is similar in many ways to the popular dribble drive motion offense with a few slight differences. Bridgeland has incorporated more dribble hand-offs, flare screens, and relocation keys that make the fence offense equally, if not more effective than the dribble drive. This video contains everything Bridgeland uses to teach the fence offense and will help you learn to use it within your own program.

    Spacing and Positioning

    Using the NBA 3-point line, players space into the baseline corners, short corner post, and have their heels on the sideline as they're free throw line extended. From there, Bridgeland shows how to create slides and reads as a ball handler gets downhill and touches the paint, creating a scoring opportunity.

    Whether it's scoring off the dribble or hitting a pitch, throw back or post slide, your players will learn to attack the rim fast and furious. Bridgeland enforces a "no standing zone" (baseline to free throw) as a way to gauge when and where players are supposed to move during a drive.

    Offensive Actions

    The best offenses have multiple actions that can be used to score the ball. Beginning with flare screen action, your players will learn to over-exaggerate their screens, preparing them for game speed action. As the ball handler attacks the paint, weak side players use a flare screen to set up an open 3-pointer. If the flare isn't open, the corner pitch is open to reverse the ball and use a two pass reverse to attack the paint again.

    When the flare isn't available, your players will be able to initiate action through dribble hand-offs on the strong side of the floor, opening up a gap for wing players to attack the rim. Off of the dribble hand-off, athletes have multiple options, including:

    • Catch and shoot
    • Catch, fake, and shoot
    • Catch, fake, two dribble attack
    • Throw back for a shot after a paint touch

    Bridgeland also demonstrates how to put both the flare and the dribble hand-off together for the main action in the offense. Using both actions together on ball reversals or initial action, your offense can get the ball into the paint and create easy scoring opportunities.

    Reads and Film

    Rounding out Bridgeland's in-depth look at the fence offense is a read drill where players learn to read the help-side and middle defenders. From there, athletes can create multiple attacking actions. Coach Bridgeland also provides a few game clips from previous seasons so you see the action in real speed.

    For coaches looking to implement an offense that's similar to (but simpler than) the dribble drive offense, look no further than Coach Bridgeland's fence offense!

    58 minutes. 2019.



    BD-05519C:

    with Eric Bridgeland,
    Whitman College Head Coach;
    led Whitman to a 104-14 record (.881) from 2014-15 through 2017-18;
    back-to-back unbeaten conference records in 2017 & 2018;
    2018 Basketball Times D-II Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 HoopDirt.com D-III Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 NABC West District Coach of the Year

    With over 300 career wins at the Division III level, Eric Bridgeland has proven he has the coaching chops to develop high-achieving teams. A run of successful seasons under Coach Bridgeland has placed Whitman as one of the top programs in the country that also focuses on developing off the court relationships and leaders in today's world. His fast-paced system has made for a fun style of play that your players will love to play within themselves.

    Philosophy

    In Coach Bridgeland's unstoppable fast break, all bets are off. Players are taught to get to the paint - no matter what. If you can keep your dribble and attack in the open court, do it! If you can hit the wings flying up the court, do it and attack middle! If you can hit a rim runner for an easy score at the rim, do it! By attacking mid-line defenders, your opponent will quickly find themselves in foul trouble and frustrated due to allowing easy buckets at the rim.

    You'll see how to teach your athletes to draw two defenders to open up the floor and create more driving lanes once the ball is in the half court. This style of play makes it tough for defenses to deny or take away any one player, as all athletes on offense are looking to attack the paint. You'll put constant pressure on the defense to stop you at the rim.

    Spacing and Rules

    In order to open the floor, Bridgeland incorporates a traditional setup: two wings, an inbounder, a post runner, and a ball handler. The ball handler looks to advance the ball as quickly as possible by dribbling or hitting the open wing ahead. Coach Bridgeland gives his point guard three rules to remember at all times:

    • Get the ball inbound quickly
    • Get to the paint as soon as possible
    • Make sure you have a trail inbounder

    Drills

    4v0 Transition will allow your players to get used to sprinting to their spots. Players start out at a 75% pace and move up and down the floor, creating proper spacing and positioning. In this pace, athletes are able to visualize where the defense will cut them off and how to reverse the ball quickly in order to create another driving angle to score.

    Using traditional fast break drills, Coach Bridgeland helps his players develop the speed and passing skills necessary to play at a fast pace and also attack the paint. Guards work in a 2v2 format, focusing on getting open off the inbound pass and attacking the middle third of the floor. They also work to get open to split their defenders and create separation.

    Rounding out the video, Bridgeland finishes with 5v0 and 5v5 situations where players have to put everything together in a set amount of time. This teaches athletes to be aware of time and score and helps them get an idea of how quickly they need to move up and down the floor in transition.

    This video from Coach Bridgeland is a great resource for any program. Your players will have fun running and attacking the basket aggressively while collecting easy transition buckets.

    61 minutes. 2019.



    BD-05519D:

    with Eric Bridgeland,
    Whitman College Head Coach;
    led Whitman to a 104-14 record (.881) from 2014-15 through 2017-18;
    back-to-back unbeaten conference records in 2017 & 2018;
    2018 Basketball Times D-II Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 HoopDirt.com D-III Men's Coach of the Year;
    2018 NABC West District Coach of the Year

    Since taking over as head coach at Whitman College, Eric Bridgeland has produced three players who have captured Northwest Conference player of the year honors. In this video, he includes a closer look at how he develops players' individual skill sets and gets them ready for the next level of competition.

    Foundational Drills

    Beginning with form shooting, Coach Bridgeland has his athletes use a low squat stance to collect power from their legs, hold their fingertips out, and over-exaggerate their follow-through to develop shooting technique.

    In the Attacking Defenders drill, your players will play 1v1 and use Bridgeland's direct drive concept: players throw the ball out in front of them and chase after it to get to the paint in as few dribbles as necessary. It's here that athletes practice getting low and clipping the hip of their defender to separate themselves from the defense.

    Advanced Skills

    After laying out the foundation moves for his players, Bridgeland kicks things up a notch. In 2 Ball Shooting, players use a variety of actions to attack the paint and get to the rim. In Rip and Go, athletes play 2v1 and work on reading the attacker as the defender makes them pull up or stop in the middle of the paint. If a player can finish around the rim, Bridgeland requires them to do so. Meanwhile, if an attacker needs to kick the ball out, the offensive player creeps and swoops around the NBA 3-point line to maximize their spacing on the floor. Bridgeland finishes the drill using the jab & fake and separation moves to equip players with the tools they need to succeed.

    In ASE Jump Shot, players relocate off of a baseline drive and work on rising into their shot. They also practice combining moves as they move around the floor, working on step backs, the rip and go, or using any other separation move they feel necessary.

    This is an excellent individual skill development video taught by a coach who has sent six players overseas to play professionally in the last 10 years. His attention to detail and emphasis on attacking the rim are universal skills that will benefit any basketball player in any system.

    58 minutes. 2019.




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    with Bob Hurley,
    former St. Anthony's High School (NJ) Basketball Coach;
    45 year career as head coach of St. Anthony's - from 1972 until the school's closing in 2017;
    Distinguished member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (2010);
    3x USA Today National Coach of the Year ('89, '96, '08);
    4x High School National Champions; 28x State Champions;
    back-to-back MaxPreps National Champions in 2010 & 2011;
    2017 ESPY Award for 'Best Coach';
    83-game win streak (2010-13); Compiled an astounding career record of 1,184 - 125 (90.5)

    One of the best coaches to ever teach the game, Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame member Bob Hurley shares his wealth of knowledge from his 45+ year career. Coach Hurley is known for his plethora of basketball drills to work on every skill and every facet of the game, and in this terrific presentation he shares not only his all time favorite drills, but also, how he likes to organize practices.

    Coach Hurley opens by sharing valuable knowledge and tips on coaching, practice planning, and drill work. No coach should ever be finished learning, and you will definitely learn a few things that you can immediately implement with your own team from this presentation.

    Pre-Practice and Warm-Up Drills

    Hurley provides his favorite pre-practice and warm-up drills that work on three foundational skills: dribbling, passing, and shooting. You'll get full and half-court drills that challenge players mentally and physically. Among the many drills, Coach Hurley shows the Fire Passing Drill that forces players to concentrate and communicate while practicing valuable fundamentals.

    The Michigan State series of drills will get your players moving and finishing around the basket. To continue working with the basketball, you'll get drills like Up Two, Back Two and the Chill Drill that teach players how to attack a trap and also work on change of direction moves.

    Rebounding and Closeout Drills

    Your team can't play offense unless it can rebound! These drills from Coach Hurley will train your players to be instinctive around the basket when securing a rebound, as well as the ability to finish with touch around the rim. The Oregon Rebounding Drill will create toughness in your team as they compete to rebound and score the basketball.

    One of the most difficult aspects of defense is the hard closeout. Hurley shares multiple drills to work on the technique of the closeout while incorporating extra things like ball screen defense with the 4 Line Passing Drill. The 3-on-3 and 4-on-3 Closeout Drills will add to your teams' defensive efficiency as they work through disadvantage situations.

    Conversion Drills

    Hurley also shares the drills that made his St. Anthony's teams so hard to score against in transition. With the 5-on-5 Conversion Defense Drill, your team will learn how to communicate and stop the ball in transition.

    Shooting Drills and Half-Court 3 on 3

    Players need to know how to play off of one another and how to play in the half-court. With Hurley's 3-on-3 half court drill, players get to practice and incorporate all the details that go into half-court offense and defense.

    Of course, no practice is complete without shooting drills. Coach Hurley shares some of his favorite shooting drills that work on shooting off the catch and off the dribble, through multiple reps. He also shares a great drill to end practice that players will love called 30 Plus a Half.

    As only one of three high school coaches to be inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, Coach Hurley has vast experience that is demonstrated through the way he runs his drills and his team. His 'old school' values still hold true to today's game, and he is truly one of the best coaches the game has ever seen. The drills in this video will immediately help improve your practices and help your team win more games!

    99 minutes. 2019.


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  • 03/23/19--22:00: High Energy Practice Drills
  • with Chris Jans,
    New Mexico State University Head Coach;
    WAC Coach of the Year 2018 & 2019; 2018 & 2019 WAC regular season and tournament champions;
    long-time, successful JUCO coach with several NJCAA Tournament appearances, including the 1998 NJCAA National Championship (Kirkwood)

    New Mexico State's Chris Jans presents seven different practice drills that you can easily implement into your practice routine. These are drills that Jans uses daily to improve his players' fundamentals, particularly on the defensive side of the ball.

    Closeouts and Defense

    Coach Jans introduces two simple, yet detailed closeout drills to begin practice. His unique take on closeouts can be implemented at any level. The skills covered in these drills must be mastered by any athlete who wants to become a quality defensive player. Each exercise has progressions that allow players to run through a high volume of quality closeouts in a variety of situations.

    After a highly efficient passing drill, Jans teaches his "2v2 Skinny" drill, which is one of his favorite exercises for working on defensive skills. This drill will help players learn to communicate with each other on defense and teaches them a valuable technique in guarding down screens.

    Advantage/Disadvantage

    Coach Jans concludes with three different advantage/disadvantage drills in both full court and half court settings. All three drills are highly competitive and force players to talk a lot in order to get stops on defense, while also training how to score quickly and efficiently on offense.

    If your practices have become mundane and routine, this is a great video to help show a different take on some popular drills, as well as some unique drills that can be used at intermediate levels and higher. Coach Jans' attention to detail is a great example for all coaches.

    70 minutes. 2019.


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    with Jamie Dixon,
    Texas Christian University Head Coach (TCU) Head Coach - 2017 NIT Champions;
    former University of Pittsburgh Head Coach;
    2009 Naismith College Coach of the Year;
    2x Big East Regular Season Championships (2004, 2011);
    USA Basketball U-19 Team Head Coach - 2009 FIBA World Championship Gold Medal

    Jamie Dixon's teams are known for playing with a high level of effort and grit. In this video, he explains the basics of the transition offense that he has developed through studying statistics and efficiency ratings.

    Coach Dixon looks to put his players in the best positions possible on the floor. Through multiple scoring options, you will see how his teams are so successful running the floor and scoring early in their offensive possessions.

    Setup

    Once your team has secured a rebound, it's off to the races. Teaching your players to run wide quickly will stretch your opponent's defense. Additionally, having players who can play any spot within your transition offense will keep the defense on their toes and create mismatches in the open floor. Dixon shows how you can create a scoring opportunity for your point guard and post to use any number of screening angles to score downhill as long as your wings get wide and to the baseline in transition.

    Attacking the Defense

    Your opponents are sure to get creative when it comes to stopping your transition offense. The key for you is to know what they are going to look to take away and how to counter it when they do.

    Dixon demonstrates several scoring options with your post and point guard, including a step up screen, a drag screen, and hit-ahead wing screen where your players can quickly attack the paint and put the defense in a mismatch situation.

    Drills

    You will see why Coach Dixon loves to use disadvantage/advantage drills to help players make choices in the open court. Through 3-on-2 and 5-on-4 drills, Dixon puts his post players in situations where they have to think about the screening angle and were they can set the "best" screen. By keeping the defense moving and unbalanced, your team will find success anywhere in the open court.

    This video gives you an inside look at how Coach Dixon's program continues to elevate their play in offensive transition. If your team can utilize a transition game in which players sprint the floor and keep the defense moving/unbalanced, you'll score more points and find more wins on your final record at the conclusion of your season.

    40 minutes. 2019.


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    with Dave Vander Meulen,
    former University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Head Coach;
    2x NABC Division III Coach of the Year;
    career .707 winning percentage

    Dave Vander Meulen spent 23 years as the head coach at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater before retiring in 2001. During that time, he collected 440 victories with a .707 winning percentage and to this day remains the all-time wins leader in UW-Whitewater history.

    This video from Vander Meuelen, a two-time NABC Coach of the Year, covers many of the best post play training techniques that he employed during his long career. You'll get drills and skills for teaching post play on both sides of the ball and coaching insights along the way that make everything easier to understand - for both you and the players you'll be instructing too.

    Body Control

    To play in the post effectively on offense, a player must know how to use their body as a weapon. By understanding body control and how the defensive player is attempting to defend you, you can use your body to open up scoring lanes. Coach Vander Meulen details how players should stay wide to create position and open up space to operate. By realizing where the defender is located relative to the ball, the offensive post player can generate passing and scoring lanes.

    Counters

    Every great post player has one or more counters to their most effective scoring moves. Over time, opposing teams will learn to cut off tendencies or make adjustments to post players and how they score. If a player is effective scoring baseline, that player must have a counter move when baseline is taken away.

    Vander Meulen covers drop step baseline, up and under, face up, and hook shot moves. He shows exactly what to do to counter and score when a defender plays on the top or bottom side.

    Straddle the Leg

    Straddling the leg as a post defender allows the athlete to "half" the offensive player's body. This helps the defender cover the top and bottom side at the same time and ensures the defender won't get sealed. Coach Vander Meulen displays how to "half" by straddling a leg and using your body to move with the offensive player. By doing so, you can take away passing lanes and make it much harder for the opponent to catch an entry pass.

    Coach Vander Meulen covers many of the basics of post play in one convenient package. You can use the instructions in this video to help your players score more easily by using counter moves to get good shots. Defensively, your athletes will learn about body control and the importance of being physical. Get better today!

    40 minutes. 2019.


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    BD-05528A:

    with Joe Kuhn,
    Joliet Junior College Head Coach;
    2016 NJCAA Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame inductee;
    2015 Illinois Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame inductee;
    2010 NJCAA National Championship

    With simultaneous screening actions that incorporate every player on the court, the blocker-mover offense is team basketball at its finest. This highly adaptable style of attack can be tailored to fit the needs of any coach and any team.

    Hall of Fame Coach Joe Kuhn shows you how you can structure the blocker-mover offense or allow for players to freelance. You will see how the system can work against man-to-man defenses as well as zones. Learn how to run your opponents through the barrage of screens that is the blocker-mover offense with the use of whiteboard diagrams, on-court demonstration, and game film.

    Offensive Entries

    Kuhn gives you three different entries into the offense for any team that frequently encounters pressure defenses. You will see how you can keep your opponent guessing with three different options for getting open at the wing using the pin screens featured in the main alignment. The "Detroit" alignment adds an extra screener to assist with extreme pressure that is giving your players trouble. You will also learn multiple options for spacing the floor when a dribble entry is needed to initiate the offense.

    Alignment Options

    This offensive system features two designated "blockers" that look to constantly screen for "movers" in their designated area. By adjusting the assignments for your blockers, you can change the spacing and screening options that are created in the offense.

    The "Lane-Lane" alignment is a great option for teams with two post players or coaches that need to find a productive use for non-scorers. This strategy will create scoring opportunities off of flare screens, pin screens, and ball screens. The "Lane-Wide" and "Wide-Wide" alignments can provide additional spacing with blockers who have more perimeter skills. The "Top-Bottom" alignment is a great way to utilize a four-guard lineup and keep a post player close to the rim. With each of these adjustments, you can tailor the offense to fit the personnel you have.

    Zone Offense

    The rules of the offense can work perfectly to take down a zone defense. Coach Kuhn shows how you can use the "Top-Bottom" alignment to create a motion offense versus the zone. In addition to basic strategies within the blocker-mover offense, you will also see two additional concepts that can be used to defeat the zone. The "Step Out-Step In" action is a great way to create a quick ball reversal that pulls out defenders to free up a post feed in the short corner.

    Transition & Set Plays

    Learn a simple transition offense that flows directly into the screening actions of the blocker-mover. You will see how you can create early scoring opportunities with drive and kicks by your movers, feeding the post, or wide pin down screens being set by the trailing blocker.

    Five set plays that perfectly complement the offense are also shown. These plays incorporate concepts from the main offense to create specific scoring opportunities. "Panther" can quickly create a 3-point shot or post opportunity. Coach Kuhn teaches how to add some additional action to your offense with hand-offs in your set plays. The "Vermont" sideline inbound play will free up a lob opportunity or get your best ball handler attacking downhill off of difficult to defend ball screen actions.

    This video from Coach Kuhn shows exactly how you can mold this classic offense to become the perfect style of attack for your team!

    88 minutes. 2019.



    BD-05528B:

    with Joe Kuhn,
    Joliet Junior College Head Coach;
    2016 NJCAA Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame inductee;
    2015 Illinois Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame inductee;
    2010 NJCAA National Championship

    When the blocker-mover offense is operating at its best, the defense will be completely scrambled as every defender on the court is caught up in screening actions. Before you can get your players to freelance within the structure of the offense, they will need to learn the reads and options involved in the multitude of available actions. Coach Joe Kuhn has constructed a series of 14 foundational drills that will help athletes execute the offense at a high level within a single season. See how you can use these drills in your practices to accelerate the learning process for your team!

    Core Drills

    Coach Kuhn presents nine practice drills that will help your players learn the various reads necessary to effectively run the blocker-mover offense. The "Get Open" drill features a variety of actions that can be rehearsed with scripted defenders to develop the instincts your players need to find scoring opportunities. This drill will help players learn how to get open on the wing by using pin down screens. Players will also learn how to play off flare screens, side ball screens, and baseline screens based on the many ways the defense can play them.

    Two different actions in the "Top Ball Screen" drill will teach your players how to get open on flex cuts or by using down screens. You can insure a higher transfer of the concepts you are practicing into games by using the "Free Lance" drill. With the use of restrictions and scripted defensive tactics, you can tweak the drill to focus on a variety of priorities that you would like to emphasize.

    Shooting Drills

    Five shooting drills break down the options within the blocker-mover offense to train your players on the shots they will take in games. The "3 Spot" shooting drill will simulate different shots that can be created off pin screens and flares for your "movers." The "Blocker Shooting" drill will condition your posts to find scoring opportunities as screeners through post ups and flashes to the ball. Finally, the "Combo" shooting drill puts both player positions together to rehearse shots off flare screens.

    This is a must-have video for any coach that is interested in using the blocker-mover offense with their team!

    54 minutes. 2019.




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    with Dan Hughes,
    Seattle Storm (WNBA) Head Coach;
    2018 WNBA Champions;
    2x WNBA Coach of the Year (2001, 2007);

    During his time coaching in the WNBA, Dan Hughes has helped mold some of the best players in the game. From being an assistant with USA Basketball, to coaching legendary player Sue Bird and rising WNBA star Breanna Stewart, Coach Hughes has worked with the talent and been part of the culture that produces championship programs.

    Through the use of his "Daily Dozen" characteristics, Coach Hughes explains how establishing your culture is the number one thing that any coach should do to build champions on and off the court.

    "Daily Dozen"

    Pursuit of Excellence

    Creating measurable expectations and establishing ways to keep players accountable will help them understand your vision. By putting focus on daily improvement, your players will learn to focus on the journey toward excellence, rather than being excellent itself.

    Learning and Growing

    Allowing your players to make mistakes and grow from them will help your athletes maintain open minds and create a coachable, growth-oriented team.

    Hard Work is Mighty

    Hard work is a must-have for any program looking to go to the next level. Being a "blue collar" program and player will demonstrate how ambition will start your journey, but hard work will lead you there in the end.

    Build Your Team with Teammates

    Chemistry is something you can't teach, but can help establish. Relationships are important for any team. Coaches Hughes discusses how creating an environment where players trust each other and like being around each other will take your team to new levels.

    Communication

    Building lines of communication where players can openly talk and speak their minds respectfully will help them learn to respectfully communicate on and off the court.

    Action Plan, Empowerment and Role Declination

    Putting people in their "sweet spot" will demonstrate you have a plan and want to put them in a position where they will be most successful. This allows players to play within themselves and execute your plan.

    Practice Planning, Ingrate Offense/Defense, and Video/Statistics

    In order to put together a successful program, you also have to be able to plan practices and put into place a solid foundation of offense and defense through the use of video and statistics. This is the proof players will needs to be successful in your program.

    Hughes also explains that ending on a positive note each day will leave your players with a good feeling and help them establish small celebrations each day. These celebrations will lead to bigger and better things, including the championship culture you're looking to create!

    Coach Hughes has found success in the WNBA and is eager to share his approach with you. Through his "Daily Dozen", you too can build a championship culture and take your team to the next level!

    52 minutes. 2019.


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    with Joe Kuhn,
    Joliet Junior College Head Coach;
    2016 NJCAA Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame inductee;
    2015 Illinois Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame inductee;
    2010 NJCAA National Championship

    With simultaneous screening actions that incorporate every player on the court, the blocker-mover offense is team basketball at its finest. This highly adaptable style of attack can be tailored to fit the needs of any coach and any team.

    Hall of Fame Coach Joe Kuhn shows you how you can structure the blocker-mover offense or allow for players to freelance. You will see how the system can work against man-to-man defenses as well as zones. Learn how to run your opponents through the barrage of screens that is the blocker-mover offense with the use of whiteboard diagrams, on-court demonstration, and game film.

    Offensive Entries

    Kuhn gives you three different entries into the offense for any team that frequently encounters pressure defenses. You will see how you can keep your opponent guessing with three different options for getting open at the wing using the pin screens featured in the main alignment. The "Detroit" alignment adds an extra screener to assist with extreme pressure that is giving your players trouble. You will also learn multiple options for spacing the floor when a dribble entry is needed to initiate the offense.

    Alignment Options

    This offensive system features two designated "blockers" that look to constantly screen for "movers" in their designated area. By adjusting the assignments for your blockers, you can change the spacing and screening options that are created in the offense.

    The "Lane-Lane" alignment is a great option for teams with two post players or coaches that need to find a productive use for non-scorers. This strategy will create scoring opportunities off of flare screens, pin screens, and ball screens. The "Lane-Wide" and "Wide-Wide" alignments can provide additional spacing with blockers who have more perimeter skills. The "Top-Bottom" alignment is a great way to utilize a four-guard lineup and keep a post player close to the rim. With each of these adjustments, you can tailor the offense to fit the personnel you have.

    Zone Offense

    The rules of the offense can work perfectly to take down a zone defense. Coach Kuhn shows how you can use the "Top-Bottom" alignment to create a motion offense versus the zone. In addition to basic strategies within the blocker-mover offense, you will also see two additional concepts that can be used to defeat the zone. The "Step Out-Step In" action is a great way to create a quick ball reversal that pulls out defenders to free up a post feed in the short corner.

    Transition & Set Plays

    Learn a simple transition offense that flows directly into the screening actions of the blocker-mover. You will see how you can create early scoring opportunities with drive and kicks by your movers, feeding the post, or wide pin down screens being set by the trailing blocker.

    Five set plays that perfectly complement the offense are also shown. These plays incorporate concepts from the main offense to create specific scoring opportunities. "Panther" can quickly create a 3-point shot or post opportunity. Coach Kuhn teaches how to add some additional action to your offense with hand-offs in your set plays. The "Vermont" sideline inbound play will free up a lob opportunity or get your best ball handler attacking downhill off of difficult to defend ball screen actions.

    This video from Coach Kuhn shows exactly how you can mold this classic offense to become the perfect style of attack for your team!

    88 minutes. 2019.


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    with Joe Kuhn,
    Joliet Junior College Head Coach;
    2016 NJCAA Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame inductee;
    2015 Illinois Basketball Coaches Hall of Fame inductee;
    2010 NJCAA National Championship

    When the blocker-mover offense is operating at its best, the defense will be completely scrambled as every defender on the court is caught up in screening actions. Before you can get your players to freelance within the structure of the offense, they will need to learn the reads and options involved in the multitude of available actions. Coach Joe Kuhn has constructed a series of 14 foundational drills that will help athletes execute the offense at a high level within a single season. See how you can use these drills in your practices to accelerate the learning process for your team!

    Core Drills

    Coach Kuhn presents nine practice drills that will help your players learn the various reads necessary to effectively run the blocker-mover offense. The "Get Open" drill features a variety of actions that can be rehearsed with scripted defenders to develop the instincts your players need to find scoring opportunities. This drill will help players learn how to get open on the wing by using pin down screens. Players will also learn how to play off flare screens, side ball screens, and baseline screens based on the many ways the defense can play them.

    Two different actions in the "Top Ball Screen" drill will teach your players how to get open on flex cuts or by using down screens. You can insure a higher transfer of the concepts you are practicing into games by using the "Free Lance" drill. With the use of restrictions and scripted defensive tactics, you can tweak the drill to focus on a variety of priorities that you would like to emphasize.

    Shooting Drills

    Five shooting drills break down the options within the blocker-mover offense to train your players on the shots they will take in games. The "3 Spot" shooting drill will simulate different shots that can be created off pin screens and flares for your "movers." The "Blocker Shooting" drill will condition your posts to find scoring opportunities as screeners through post ups and flashes to the ball. Finally, the "Combo" shooting drill puts both player positions together to rehearse shots off flare screens.

    This is a must-have video for any coach that is interested in using the blocker-mover offense with their team!

    54 minutes. 2019.


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    with Brenda Frese,
    University of Maryland Head Women's Coach;
    Back-to-Back Final Four appearances (2014-15);
    2006 National Champions;
    2002 AP National Coach of the Year; 2002 USBWA Women's National Coach of the Year; 4x Conference Coach of the Year

    Zone defenses are used at all levels of basketball to help stop opposing offenses. However, few teams use zones on a consistent basis because coaches don't know how to defend a handful of key situations using a zone defense.

    In this video, 2006 NCAA Championship coach Brenda Frese \shows you all the tactics you need to run the 1-2-2 defense. Coach Frese details how to install the 1-2-2 zone, the coverages within the zone, defending seven situations within the zone defense, as well as how to defend against three offense sets within the 1-2-2.

    Installation and Coverages

    Frese takes you step-by-step through what all five players' responsibilities are within the 1-2-2 match-up zone. You will see how:

    • The 1-guard or "boss man" dictates the top of the zone defense
    • To protect the paint and force jump shots
    • To create defensive triangles
    • To defend when players get beat and are out of position

    Defending Multiple Fronts

    Coach Frese shows how to defend a 2-1-2 front, 1-4 high set, and 4-out 1-in set using her match-up zone defense. Demonstrations include:

    • The 7-on-5 drill to help teach defensive rotations
    • How to front the post when the ball is in the corner, while still preventing the lob over the top
    • How to prevent two players from guarding the same person
    • How to get your players to move on the pass instead of the catch

    Defending Special Situations

    Through the use of game film and on-court demonstration, you will see seven special situations that arise when using the 1-2-2 match-up zone. Frese teaches you how to stop a star player from receiving the ball in the match-up zone, as well as how to guard against high post flashes within the zone.

    Additionally, Frese explains how to guard against dribble penetration, how to stop cutting action to the weak and strong sides of the court, how to defend against ball and middle screens, how to defend against skip passes, and how to trap the corners from your 1-2-2 alignment.

    Coach Frese shows how effective the use of a 1-2-2 zone can be whether it be defending inbound situations, defending the high post or trapping in corners. Frese walks you through how to install, implement and win with a smothering 1-2-2 match-up zone!

    87 minutes. 2019.


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    Featuring:
    Raegan Pebley,
    Texas Christian University Head Women's Coach; 2x Mountain West Conference Tournament Champions; over 200 career wins; as a player, was a 2x All-Big 12 forward and played 2 seasons in the WNBA

    Taylor Larson,
    Texas Christian University Sr. Assistant Strength & Conditioning Coach; 2018 Staff Member of the Year at Central Michigan University

    Essence Carson,
    11-year WNBA player, currently a member of the Phoenix Mercury; 2016 WNBA Champion with the Los Angeles Sparks; 2011 WNBA All-Star with the New York Liberty; 3x Big East Defensive Player of the Year at Rutgers University

    Brian Agler,
    Dallas Wings (WNBA) Head Coach; 2x WNBA Champion (Seattle Storm 2010, Los Angeles Sparks 2016); 2010 WNBA Coach of the Year;most wins in women's professional basketball in the United States; back-to-back championships in the ABL (Columbus Quest '97 & '98) and 1997 Coach of the Year;

    Coaches are in for a real treat when they pick up this video featuring presentations from four knowledgeable insiders associated with teaching and improving in the game of basketball!

    To kick things off, TCU women's head coach Raegan Pebley provides an hour and a half practice session full of drills and coaching strategy. Once her practice concludes, Pebley paves the way for TCU strength & conditioning coach Taylor Larson, 11-year WNBA veteran Essence Carson, and two-time WNBA champion coach Brian Agler to speak on separate tenants of team and athlete development. There's plenty of great insight that any coach can immediately implement with their own program!

    TCU Women's Practice

    Are you looking for an alternative to traditional layup lines to get your players warmed up and, as an added bonus, communicating effectively with each other? Coach Pebley demonstrates how to instantly start off practice with exceptional engagement and a brisk warm-up using TCU's own take on the Circle Layup Drill.

    One of the great benefits of watching an actual live practice is to observe how great coaches use both time and vocabulary effectively. Pebley offers many examples of how her and her staff use an economy of language to help maximize time on task and minimize cumbersome explanations about the goals and execution of various drills.

    Both offensive and defensive drills are mixed to help show you how to create a comprehensive and competitive practice. There are a number of instances where Pebley tweaks the set-up for a particular drill to help emphasize a particular offensive or defensive concept.

    Additionally, the near constant emphasis on timing and scoring in every drill will give you plenty of examples to show how to keep the competitive level of your team at a high pitch when designing your own practice plan.

    The TCU practice portion of this video provides:

    • Over 14 team and individual drills that maximize player engagement and development.
    • Several unique methods to help improve your transition game, both offensively and defensively.
    • Multiple ways to help build a culture of confidence and aggressiveness in your team.

    Watching Coach Pebley's demonstration of how to run a high-level practice is a great way to stimulate your own thinking and help make every practice more effective.

    Strength & Conditioning

    If you feel that your players are being out-ran, out-jumped and out-muscled, it may be time to take a look at what you are (or aren't) doing in the weight room. Coach Larson brings his expertise to light as he discusses how to incorporate a quality strength training routine into daily basketball life.

    Larson begins by discussing the importance of quality movement as the fundamental building block of everything his athletes do. You'll come to understand how he trains freshmen differently than seniors, and how to progress through vital exercises to maximize performance while reducing injury risk.

    There are sure to be common mistakes that occur during your training, and Coach Larson touches on a few of those along with his ways to correct them. His philosophy is to identify fundamental weaknesses that athletes have and try to combat them directly.

    In order for athletes to compete at a high level, they must improve from more than just a skill standpoint - they must condition their body to be in peak sport specific shape, both physically and mentally. Coach Larson outlines some of the most important concepts associated with this process and opens up a lengthy Q&A time during his clinic setting for maximum value to those who watch. The concepts addresses in his presentation can be applied to teams at any level.

    Next-Level Preparation

    Essence Carson, a high level player collegiately and professionally, shares valuable insights "from the perspective of a player" on the tremendous value of what coaches can provide not only on the court, but equally (if not more importantly) off the court. She talks about how her childhood coaches helped shape her into the professional she is today and how to pass similar lessons on to other players in today's game.

    Carson also discusses what it takes from both the athlete and coaching standpoint on how to be successful in today's ultra-competitive environment. She talks about preparation for games and how often times games are won or lost before they even start.

    Finally, Carson dives into how players need to develop counter moves to make them a more complete player. This includes moves for dribbling, shooting, and what she describes as "the lost art of passing."

    Team Defense

    Brian Agler discusses the fundamentals of building a solid, unified team defense. Coach Agler keeps it as simple as possible in his coaching philosophy, and states that he basic


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    with John Calipari,
    University of Kentucky Head Coach;
    2012 NCAA National Champions; 2014 NCAA Championship Runner-Up;
    Distinguished member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (2015);
    3x Naismith National Coach of the Year ('96, '08, '15); 3x NABC Coach of the Year ('96, '09, '15);
    AP College Coach of the Year (2015); 2x Basketball Times Coach of the Year ('96, '15); 2x Adolph Rupp Cup ('10, '15);
    30x conference (SEC, C-USA, A10) Championships (15x regular season, 15x tournament)

    Hall of Fame coach John Calipari opens up his practice for both players and coaches in this unique video series. Coach Calipari covers every phase of the game and practice planning as he takes you through a fast-paced and intense practice setting.

    Part 1

    Starting with a series of warm-up drills, you'll see how you can work multiple phases of the game in either a full court or half court setting. Coach Calipari covers both shooting and conditioning drills that get players to ratchet up practice intensity from the moment they set foot on the court. By emphasizing goal-oriented ways to keep track of various drills, you'll see how players must maintain a sharp focus and perform at game speed as they work to improve passing, shooting and communication.

    Coach Calipari also shows how an emphasis on quick transition can put pressure on defenses and flow seamlessly into other offensive options that will help your team improve their scoring efficiency.

    One of the many insights you'll be privy to in this video are the numerous ways Calipari motivates and challenges his players during the course of the drill. Coaches will get the chance to see and hear Cal explain the reasoning behind the techniques he uses to keep players performing at a consistently high level.

    Calipari also covers the mental aspect of practice and game planning. You'll see how a nationally ranked team builds resiliency and toughness through different competitive scenarios. Additionally, you will learn how defining player roles and increasing trust among teammates helps contribute to a consistent winning culture.

    Part 2

    In the second portion of this video, Coach Calipari utilizes his assistant coaches to show how to assess and improve individual and team shooting. There is a strong emphasis on accountability and fundamental technique as a variety of shooting drills designed to increase accuracy and build range are covered.

    There is tremendous value for coaches in watching practice footage as players compete and struggle in challenging shooting drills. There are both individual and team formatted drills, and the instruction covers all different kinds of shots and combinations. Footwork off shot fakes, stop-and-go and retreat dribbles are addressed and help players improve in virtually every shooting situation. You'll see firsthand how goal tracking drills help players transfer skills from practice to games.

    After a heavy emphasis on offensive development in part 1 of this video, the attention turns to the defensive end in part 2. Calipari's staff shows how to improve rotations and court coverage utilizing both 1-3-1 and 2-3 zones. A particular emphasis on matching players to specific positions in the zone will help you get the most out of every player on your roster.

    Coach Calipari openly shares specific points of emphasis and how to get the most out athletes at each position on the floor. By going over the evolution and tweaks he has made to his own coaching style throughout the years, Cal illustrates how you can adapt the different drills and approaches used here to fit your own particular coaching needs.

    2 Videos (223 minutes). 2019.


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    with Chantal Vallee,
    Hamilton Honey Badgers (Canadian Elite Basketball League) Head Coach & GM;
    University of Windsor Head Women's Basketball Coach;
    Five straight Canadian Interuniversity Sports (CIS) Women's Basketball National Titles (2011-2015);
    2x CIS Women's Basketball Coach of the Year;
    ATHENA International Leadership Award, 2012

    Master both sides to the transition game through this inside look at a training camp-style session conducted by Coach Chantal Vallee. This video will give you an array of new ideas as Vallee installs her offensive and defensive strategies to their system for playing in transition. In addition to the overall scheme, you will see how players learn to play offense and defense in the full court with over 10 practice drills.

    Transition Offense

    Coach Vallee shows how to explode, explore, and exploit the defense using various zones on the court. Breakdown drills such as "Run, Rabbit, Run" will help your players emphasize sprinting down the floor as soon as the rebound is secured.

    Learn how to maintain the attack versus defensive strategies trying to stall your fast break in the "Outlet" drill. The "Trailer" drill teaches your players to read the defense to determine whether to score through feeding the post, running into the ball screen, or other options. You will also get to see four drills in the "Flow" series that teach athletes to pass with precision on the run and also capitalize on advantageous numbers on fast breaks.

    Transition Defense

    You will be hard pressed to find a more detailed explanation for any system of transition defense than what you will see in this training camp. Coach Vallee provides a full description of her defensive approach through whiteboard diagrams, on-court teaching, and player demonstration through breakdown drills and 5-on-5 scrimmage. Her aggressive style will optimize your team's ability to get second chance points through offensive rebounds while also being able to disrupt the other team's fast break.

    Learn how the "Short" can chase down "spillage" or hunt the outlet pass to stop the ball from advancing up the court. The "Long Triangles" drill helps players understand how to crowd the floor with proper spacing away from their match-up in the full court. Coach Vallee also shares a great way to control the 5-on-5 competition with the "1 & 1/2" drill.

    This video is an incredible value with the opportunity to learn both transition offense and defense from one of the 'rising stars' in basketball coaching in North America!

    148 minutes. 2019.


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    with Chantal Vallee,
    Hamilton Honey Badgers (Canadian Elite Basketball League) Head Coach & GM;
    University of Windsor Head Women's Basketball Coach;
    Five straight Canadian Interuniversity Sports (CIS) Women's Basketball National Titles (2011-2015);
    2x CIS Women's Basketball Coach of the Year;
    ATHENA International Leadership Award, 2012

    Chantal Vallee provides a unique opportunity to see how she installs the two motion offenses that comprise her half court offensive system. Coach Vallee pulls no punches with the information she shares in this video. You will fill your notebook with her unparalleled commitment to explaining the offenses through whiteboard diagrams, on-court teaching, and player demonstration. Elements of the offense are shown through breakdown drills as well as all together in 5-on-5 scrimmages. This video has something for any coach who utilizes a motion offense with their team.

    High-Low

    Learn how to pound the ball inside through the power game of the high-low motion offense. Coach Vallee breaks down the offense through position-specific drills. You'll see critical teaching points for using the L-cut to get open at the wing and score. Posts demonstrate how to play off each other to get open at the high post or low post with v-cuts and screens.

    A 2-on-2 drill will teach your low posts how to create angles with proper footwork to seal their defender and score at the rim. Coach Vallee also shows an effective way to post your point guard with a back screen entry into the high-low offense. You'll get the progression of reads a high post needs to make as they play through the triangle created with their teammates.

    4-Out Motion

    You will also see a secondary motion offense that emphasizes attacking the rim with drives. This offense utilizes four perimeter players to create great spacing. Coach Vallee explains the simple rules that provide a basic structure while creating a variety of scoring options. You will see how players can score through drives, back door cuts, off-ball screens, and pick & rolls.

    Players demonstrate four methods for how to attack with momentum from blast cuts. The 4v0 Perimeter Movement drill puts a special emphasis on integrating post flashes into the offense. This option creates numerous screening opportunities while opening up the rim.

    Coach Vallee's offensive system will work for any team - no matter whether you prefer to play with size or speed. Add to your team's versatility and become more efficient on offense today!

    113 minutes. 2019.


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    BD-05529A:

    with Chantal Vallee,
    Hamilton Honey Badgers (Canadian Elite Basketball League) Head Coach & GM;
    University of Windsor Head Women's Basketball Coach;
    Five straight Canadian Interuniversity Sports (CIS) Women's Basketball National Titles (2011-2015);
    2x CIS Women's Basketball Coach of the Year;
    ATHENA International Leadership Award, 2012

    Chantal Vallee provides a unique opportunity to see how she installs the two motion offenses that comprise her half court offensive system. Coach Vallee pulls no punches with the information she shares in this video. You will fill your notebook with her unparalleled commitment to explaining the offenses through whiteboard diagrams, on-court teaching, and player demonstration. Elements of the offense are shown through breakdown drills as well as all together in 5-on-5 scrimmages. This video has something for any coach who utilizes a motion offense with their team.

    High-Low

    Learn how to pound the ball inside through the power game of the high-low motion offense. Coach Vallee breaks down the offense through position-specific drills. You'll see critical teaching points for using the L-cut to get open at the wing and score. Posts demonstrate how to play off each other to get open at the high post or low post with v-cuts and screens.

    A 2-on-2 drill will teach your low posts how to create angles with proper footwork to seal their defender and score at the rim. Coach Vallee also shows an effective way to post your point guard with a back screen entry into the high-low offense. You'll get the progression of reads a high post needs to make as they play through the triangle created with their teammates.

    4-Out Motion

    You will also see a secondary motion offense that emphasizes attacking the rim with drives. This offense utilizes four perimeter players to create great spacing. Coach Vallee explains the simple rules that provide a basic structure while creating a variety of scoring options. You will see how players can score through drives, back door cuts, off-ball screens, and pick & rolls.

    Players demonstrate four methods for how to attack with momentum from blast cuts. The 4v0 Perimeter Movement drill puts a special emphasis on integrating post flashes into the offense. This option creates numerous screening opportunities while opening up the rim.

    Coach Vallee's offensive system will work for any team - no matter whether you prefer to play with size or speed. Add to your team's versatility and become more efficient on offense today!

    113 minutes. 2019.



    BD-05529B:

    with Chantal Vallee,
    Hamilton Honey Badgers (Canadian Elite Basketball League) Head Coach & GM;
    University of Windsor Head Women's Basketball Coach;
    Five straight Canadian Interuniversity Sports (CIS) Women's Basketball National Titles (2011-2015);
    2x CIS Women's Basketball Coach of the Year;
    ATHENA International Leadership Award, 2012

    Allow Chantal Vallee to show you exactly how she led the University of Windsor to five straight Canadian national titles! This inside look into a training camp setting run by Coach Vallee will give you an unparalleled chance to learn her defensive system. You'll see how to squeeze the space your opponent can utilize while preventing the drive with the pack line defense. Vallee also details her "Sparta" man-to-man style that prioritizes eliminating the opportunity for 3-point shots.

    Coach Vallee provides an in-depth explanation for both of her defenses through detailed lecture and diagrams as well as on-court walk through with her players. You will learn how to warm up your players with a 1-on-1 closeout drill series that teaches athletes to adjust their coverage based on whether they are trying to contain the drive or prevent the perimeter shot.

    Pack Defense

    The Pack defense places a huge emphasis on forcing players to their weak hand and providing help support on dribble penetration. See how Vall‚e builds this strategy from 2-on-2 breakdown drills to full 5-on-5 play. These drills will teach your players proper defensive positioning to force the ball toward the weak side of the floor. You'll also learn how to rotate defenders on baseline drives with a two or three-player switch. Coach Vallee explains how rotations adjust based on the position of the post defender.

    Sparta Defense

    The Sparta defense changes the focus to preventing 3-point shots. With this strategy, less help is provided by defenders as they deny their match-ups. Coach Vallee explains how the on-ball defender takes responsibility for forcing their match-up into a low percentage shot through proper close outs, creating a cushion on the drive, and challenging the shot with the "Ghosting" technique.

    If you love playing man-to-man defense, this system taught by Coach Vallee will provide unique tactics that you can easily begin using with your own team.

    91 minutes. 2019.



    BD-05529C:

    with Chantal Vallee,
    Hamilton Honey Badgers (Canadian Elite Basketball League) Head Coach & GM;
    University of Windsor Head Women's Basketball Coach;
    Five straight Canadian Interuniversity Sports (CIS) Women's Basketball National Titles (2011-2015);
    2x CIS Women's Basketball Coach of the Year;
    ATHENA International Leadership Award, 2012

    Master both sides to the transition game through this inside look at a training camp-style session conducted by Coach Chantal Vallee. This video will give you an array of new ideas as Vallee installs her offensive and defensive strategies to their system for playing in transition. In addition to the overall scheme, you will see how players learn to play offense and defense in the full court with over 10 practice drills.

    Transition Offense

    Coach Vallee shows how to explode, explore, and exploit the defense using various zones on the court. Breakdown drills such as "Run, Rabbit, Run" will help your players emphasize sprinting down the floor as soon as the rebound is secured.

    Learn how to maintain the attack versus defensive strategies trying to stall your fast break in the "Outlet" drill. The "Trailer" drill teaches your players to read the defense to determine whether to score through feeding the post, running into the ball screen, or other options. You will also get to see four drills in the "Flow" series that teach athletes to pass with precision on the run and also capitalize on advantageous numbers on fast breaks.

    Transition Defense

    You will be hard pressed to find a more detailed explanation for any system of transition defense than what you will see in this training camp. Coach Vallee provides a full description of her defensive approach through whiteboard diagrams, on-court teaching, and player demonstration through breakdown drills and 5-on-5 scrimmage. Her aggressive style will optimize your team's ability to get second chance points through offensive rebounds while also being able to disrupt the other team's fast break.

    Learn how the "Short" can chase down "spillage" or hunt the outlet pass to stop the ball from advancing up the court. The "Long Triangles" drill helps players understand how to crowd the floor with proper spacing away from their match-up in the full court. Coach Vallee also shares a great way to control the 5-on-5 competition with the "1 & 1/2" drill.

    This video is an incredible value with the opportunity to learn both transition offense and defense from one of the 'rising stars' in basketball coaching in North America!

    148 minutes. 2019.




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    with Chantal Vallee,
    Hamilton Honey Badgers (Canadian Elite Basketball League) Head Coach & GM;
    University of Windsor Head Women's Basketball Coach;
    Five straight Canadian Interuniversity Sports (CIS) Women's Basketball National Titles (2011-2015);
    2x CIS Women's Basketball Coach of the Year;
    ATHENA International Leadership Award, 2012

    Allow Chantal Vallee to show you exactly how she led the University of Windsor to five straight Canadian national titles! This inside look into a training camp setting run by Coach Vallee will give you an unparalleled chance to learn her defensive system. You'll see how to squeeze the space your opponent can utilize while preventing the drive with the pack line defense. Vallee also details her "Sparta" man-to-man style that prioritizes eliminating the opportunity for 3-point shots.

    Coach Vallee provides an in-depth explanation for both of her defenses through detailed lecture and diagrams as well as on-court walk through with her players. You will learn how to warm up your players with a 1-on-1 closeout drill series that teaches athletes to adjust their coverage based on whether they are trying to contain the drive or prevent the perimeter shot.

    Pack Defense

    The Pack defense places a huge emphasis on forcing players to their weak hand and providing help support on dribble penetration. See how Vall‚e builds this strategy from 2-on-2 breakdown drills to full 5-on-5 play. These drills will teach your players proper defensive positioning to force the ball toward the weak side of the floor. You'll also learn how to rotate defenders on baseline drives with a two or three-player switch. Coach Vallee explains how rotations adjust based on the position of the post defender.

    Sparta Defense

    The Sparta defense changes the focus to preventing 3-point shots. With this strategy, less help is provided by defenders as they deny their match-ups. Coach Vallee explains how the on-ball defender takes responsibility for forcing their match-up into a low percentage shot through proper close outs, creating a cushion on the drive, and challenging the shot with the "Ghosting" technique.

    If you love playing man-to-man defense, this system taught by Coach Vallee will provide unique tactics that you can easily begin using with your own team.

    91 minutes. 2019.